Our Resident Memorials

Sometimes it is not possible for the memorials we rescue or restore to be placed back into the buildings where they were originally located. This can be for a number reasons such as the building is to be demolished, there is a risk of theft or vandalism or there is (or will be) a change of use/ownership of the premises.

In these cases, we are able to take the memorial concerned into our custody in the Chancel of All Saints' Church where we have a number of bespoke display stands and equipment. Wherever possible, each memorial is accompanied by details of the building where it was originally located together with whatever information we have been able to gather concerning the men listed on the memorial.

It is these memorials which are available to view on our open days. Our Open Days for 2016 can be found here.


2nd Lieutenant G. E. Woodward

2nd Lieutenant George Ernest Woodward was a junior officer in the 2nd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment and was killed in action on 29th September 1918 aged 28.  He was the son of James and Maria Woodward and the husband of Florence (Florrie) all of whom lived in Thurlaston, a small village approx. six miles to the west of  Leicester.

The memorial was originally sited inside the Baptist Chapel in Thurlaston and is thought to have been paid  for by his wife - Florrie.  Many years ago the memorial was moved outside the chapel and began to suffer damage caused by exposure to traffic pollution and the effects of the weather.  In 2004, the memorial was donated to the Hinckley Museum; however, due to space limitations they were unable to display the memorial properly.  In 2015,  Hinckley Museum asked the Project to take the memorial into its care.  This was something we were only too pleased to do and the memorial now forms part of our Resident Memorials collection.

A picture of 2nd Lt. Woodward's headstone in the Pigeon Ravine Cemetery can be found on this link.

 


Leicester Dyers & Scourers Trade Society - Roll of Honour

 

Leicester Dyers & ScourersThe Society was a trade union body which ceased to exist in 1974 when its remaining members at that time were absorbed into the much larger National Union of Hosiery and Knitwear Workers.

It is belived that the original postcard size Roll of Honour was given to each man/family named and the companies mentioned – famous Leicester textile names in their day - were possibly given a large card version which they could frame.  Being somewhat fragile these have not survived.

The Society's records are held at the National Archives and our record of the Roll of Honour will be offered to them if it is not included in the papers they hold.

 

  


Leicester Boy Scouts Association

 

This is a framed commemorative certificate-type memorial dedicated to the Scoutmasters, Patrol Leaders, Seconds and Scouts of the Leicester [Boy Scouts] Association. It includes the names of 73 men connected with the Association who lost their lives during WW1.

It is a hand-drawn certificate and bears the name of M M Whittle as the possible identity of the artist with an accompanying date of 1920.

The history and background into this memorial work is presently being researched by Roy-Anthony Birch who is a research volunteer with the Project.

 

 


Vann Street Methodist Church

In mid-June 2014, we took into our care a further addition to our 'Resident Memorials' collection. The memorial commemorates the lives of 20 men who died in WW1 and who would have had some connection with the Vann Street Methodist Church in the Loughborough Road area of Leicester where the memorial was originally sited.

The Methodist Church became the Belgrave Union Church who took the memorial with them when they went on to relocate to their current Elmdale Street site. The Vann Street church was then closed and subsequently demolished to make way for housing.

The memorial remained at the Belgrave Union Church until Chris Stephens from the Project noticed that it had been moved from its usual place of prominence. On contacting the church we were able to secure its recovery into our collection.






Vernon Road Methodist Church
 
This memorial was originally sited in the Methodist Church on Vernon Road, Aylestone, Leicester. The memorial is in the form of a brass plaque containing the names of 21 men who died in WW1 and who were either members of the church or local schools. Interestingly, the memorial quotes the period of the war being from 1914 to 1919.

Although the church building is extant it is no longer a place of worship and is now occupied by a double-glazing company.














St. James the Less, Aylestone

This memorial was passed on to us by the Church of the Nativity in Aylestone Park, Leicester who had taken it into their care when the church of St. James the Less was closed. The memorial contains the names of 154 people who died during WW1 and who would have had ties with either the church or the local community. As can be seen there are a number of people on the memorial who would have been from the same family such as the Peggs and Mullahys.

The church of St. James the Less has totally vanished and a small housing development now stands on its former site.


The memorial is made of slate with the names being engraved into it and embossed in gold. As with the Vernon Road memorial, this memorial also quotes the duration of the war being from 1914 to 1919.  The memorial will join our other memorials when a display stand has been made for it.  The mottled effect noticeable on the picture is simply the reflection from the stained-glass windows on the eastern side of the chancel building.

 


 

Old Newtonians Memorial Tablets












Lance Corporal Atkinson-Hall - Certificate of Disabled Discharge


During WW1, if a serviceman was wounded or contracted an illness which resulted in them no longer being fit and able to serve, then they would have been discharged and given a Silver War Badge and a Certificate of Disabled Discharge.

The Silver War Badge was regarded by many as an honour but it also served a very practical purpose in showing to the public that the wearer had done their duty and so would not be subjected to taunts of cowardice. An example  of a Silver War Badge can be seen in the image to the right.





St. Saviour’s Road Church, Leicester

Stained-Glass Windows

 

Pictured above are "light box" recreations of the three stained-glass memorial windows which were located at the church: sadly, the original windows were lost to vandalism some years ago.  Our light boxes are now the  only way to view the windows in anything like their intended, original state.

The windows commemorate the lives of three soldiers killed in the First World War, namely;

1 - Lt. Frank Percy Haines, 8th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment;

2 - 2nd Lt. Harvey Priestman Flint MC, 9th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment;  and

3 - Cpl Bertrand Hatton West; King's Royal Rifle Corps

 

Memorial Board

Located within the church was a Memorial Board bearing the names of 216 men in the parish who fell in the First World War.  Below are images of the Memorial Board in situ at the church showing how it looked before (below left) and after it was vandalised.

 

It was originally intended that the black panels bearing the names of the fallen men would be restored.  However, upon inspection, the panels were found to have deteriorated to such a state where the men's names were barely legible and in some cases not at all.

It was therefore decided that a local artist/designer would be instructed to create a faithful reproduction of the board.  This was completed in September 2014 (see image below);  together with the light-box reproductions of the stained-glass windows, the recreated board now forms a striking part of the collection of memorial items from St. Saviour's Church in our Resident Memorials Collection.


 



St.Michael’s Church, Scott Street, Knighton, Leicester

  • 2 x WW1 slate tablets;
  • 2 x WW2 slate tablets;
  • Memorial plaque for Thomas Whittingham and V.P. Bosworth






United Reformed Church, Evington Road, Leicester
  • framed picture containing photographs of members serving in WW2; and
  • Memorial plaque for K. Carter and H. Hopkins.





 


























Harry Hopkins was a Flight Lieutenant in the RAF. In 1944, he was in 158 Squadron stationed at RAF Lissett in East Yorkshire.  Harry joined the squadron on 11 July 1944 and on the afternoon of Friday, 14 July 1944 he was the pilot of a Halifax bomber (HX338) taking part in a training mission. At 19h55, the Halifax was abandoned over the south Wales coast in an incident which killed Harry, his flight engineer and the mid-upper gunner. Harry is buried in the Gilroes Cemetery, Leicester in a plot now shared with his wife, Frances, who passed away in 2008 over sixty years later. Our thanks to Kevin Bryett and Rolph Walker of the 158 Squadron Association for their assistance in providing us with details of Harry's service with that squadron.







St.Augustine’s Church, Newfoundpool, Leicester
  • memorial column





Belgrave Liberal Club, Leicester






St. Mark's Church, Belgrave, Leicester

Although the memorial from St. Marks no longer exists, it does carry a story which highlights the way in which memorials can be put "at risk", often quite innocently by their guardians.

St. Mark's possessed a wooden memorial board providing the names of local men, and men connected with that church, who served and died in World War One. Approximately ten years ago, the memorial was found to be suffering from woodworm and, sadly, the memorial was burned and destroyed.

Fortunately, before it was destroyed, a valuable friend of the Project (Michael Doyle) had photographed and recorded the memorial's details as part of a much wider work they were undertaking on Leicestershire's war memorials as a whole.

Details of the memorial, together with a photograph of the memorial itself, are set out on an information board as part of the display of the memorial from the Belgrave Liberal Club.

We are indebted to Michael Doyle for his assistance to us.


St. Marks' Church was a stopping point for those on the Jarrow March in 1936 where they received new boots. The church is no longer a consecrated place of worship and has most recently been used as a banqueting centre.





Cross Street Methodist Church

Memorial plaque to the 15 former members of the church's Sunday school who died in the Great War.







Leicester City, County & Rutland "At Risk" War Memorials Project is a company limited by guarantee and incorporated in England under company registration number 08176202. The address of the company's registered office is The Chancel, rear of All Saints' Church, Highcross, Leicester LE1 4PH. Patron: John Florance. Registered as a charity for tax purposes with HMRC.  © Leicester City, County & Rutland "At Risk" War Memorials Project 2017.
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